Symposia, Lectures, and Roundtables

A Range of Exciting Programs

The Center’s programs bring together scholars, practitioners, regulators, and judges to study how best to improve the functioning of a market-based economy. Among the programs regularly held are:

The Brooklyn Journal for Corporate, Financial and Commercial Law annual symposium draws academics, government officials, and practitioners to the Law School to discuss timely issues in the field. The inaugural symposium of the Center will reflect on the Consumer Protection Bureau after its first year of operation.

The Barry L. Zaretsky Roundtable Series honors the late Professor Barry L. Zaretsky, a beloved mentor, distinguished scholar of bankruptcy and commercial law, and a dedicated classroom teacher. His work inside and outside the classroom bridged the worlds of theory and practice in these fields. The roundtable program joins a distinguished panel of practitioners, judges and academics to discuss cutting-edge bankruptcy and commercial law topics. Students also join the conversation, spurring further exploration of difficult questions in this area.

The Abraham L. Pomerantz Lecture commemorates the life and work of Abraham Pomerantz, a 1924 graduate of the Law School. He is considered by many to have been the "dean of the class action bar." Pomerantz pioneered suits by small shareholders against officials of big corporations and specialized in so-called derivative suits, in which the company receives the award and passes it on to all stockholders. The biennial lecture focuses on topics of corporate securities law and related issues of professional responsibility that brings nationally-recognized scholars to the Law School to debate a timely topic. The law firm of Pomerantz LLP, of which Abraham Pomerantz was the founding partner, provides continuing support for this series.

Past Event

Barry L. Zaretsky Roundtable Discussion - Bankruptcy M&A

Thursday, March 1
6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Brooklyn Law School
Feil Hall
Forchelli Conference Center, 22nd Floor
205 State Street
Brooklyn, NY

By Invitation Only

About the Discussion
Mergers and acquisitions of solvent and insolvent firms happen all the time, in bankruptcy and out. The question for discussion is whether, and how, financial distress changes the practical and legal environment. Should corporate law be the model in bankruptcy? Or should bankruptcy law and bankruptcy courts pay special attention to distress situations? Specific concerns include runs, information asymmetry, adequacy of representation, conflict of interest and equitable value distribution. This roundtable will provide a forum for academics and practitioners with expertise in bankruptcy and corporate law to explore such thorny topics as: (1) empty creditors; (2) lockups and plan support agreements; (3) blocking and control positions and how they are allocated; (4) creditor disclosure; and (5) vote designation.

The program is being presented in conjunction with the Brooklyn Journal of Corporate, Financial and Commercial Law Symposium: The Market for Corporate Control in the Zone of Insolvency, to be held the next day. For information on the symposium, visit.

Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Business Law and Regulation and the American Bankruptcy Institute

Past Programs and Events

  • Watch video of the event.

    Paul J. Fishman was nominated by President Barack Obama as the United States Attorney for the District of New Jersey in June 2009. As U.S. Attorney, he is responsible for overseeing all federal criminal investigations and prosecutions and the litigation of all civil matters in New Jersey in which the federal government has an interest. Fishman supervises a staff of approximately 145 attorneys and 115 support personnel in Newark, Camden, and Trenton. 

    In addition to his service as U.S. Attorney, Fishman is a member of the Attorney General’s Advisory Committee of U.S. Attorneys (“AGAC”). He served as Vice-Chair of the AGAC from 2009-2011, and Chair from 2011-2012. Created in 1973, the AGAC represents the voice of the U.S. Attorneys and provides advice and counsel to the Attorney General on policy, management, and operational issues affecting the offices of the United States Attorneys across the country.

    Sponsored by the Center for Business Law and Regulation and the Center for Criminal Justice.

  • Co-Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Business Law and Regulation and the American Bankruptcy Institute

    Brooklyn Law School will host the second annual Young Bankruptcy Scholars’ Work-in-Progress Workshop. The workshop will bring together promising young scholars in the areas of bankruptcy, commercial law, and consumer financial protection to present their work before leading national bankruptcy scholars. The workshop will help senior scholars to mentor junior scholars, and raise the profile of bankruptcy scholarship within the academy and the profession.

  • Co-Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Business Law and Regulation and the American Bankruptcy Institute

    Brooklyn Law School will host the first annual Young Bankruptcy Scholars’ Work-in-Progress Workshop. The workshop will bring together promising young scholars in the areas of bankruptcy, commercial law, and consumer financial protection to present their work before leading national bankruptcy scholars. The workshop will help senior scholars to mentor junior scholars, and raise the profile of bankruptcy scholarship within the academy and the profession.

  • Speaker: Vice Chancellor J. Travis Laster, Delaware Court of Chancery

    Discussants:
    T. Brad Davey, Partner, Potter Anderson & Corroon LLP

    Michael Garland
    , Assistant Comptroller for Environmental, Social and Governance, New York City Office of the Comptroller

    Roy J. Katzovicz, Partner, Investment Team Member and Chief Legal Officer of Pershing Square Capital Management, L.P.

    Paul K. Rowe, Partner, Litigation, Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz

    Moderator: Professor Minor Myers, Brooklyn Law School

    Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Business Law and Regulation


    About the Discussion
    Corporate bylaws are an increasingly important battleground for stockholder rights. Forum selection bylaws, for example, purport to designate the one and only court where stockholders may file suit. More recently, a few bold firms have adopted fee-shifting bylaws that would force unsuccessful stockholder-plaintiffs to cover the corporation’s cost of legal defense.

    While the bylaws of a corporation are often characterized as a contract, many are adopted unilaterally by boards of directors. What limits does “reasonableness” review place on corporate bylaws? Is legislation appropriate to remove issues from the reach of bylaws?  

    Please join us for an exploration of these issues with Vice Chancellor Laster and a distinguished panel of practitioners.

    About Vice Chancellor J. Travis Laster
    J. Travis Laster is a Vice Chancellor on the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware. He received his A.B summa cum laude from Princeton University and his J.D. and M.A. from the University of Virginia, where he served on the Virginia Law Review, was a member of the Order of the Coif, and received the Law School Alumni Association Award for Academic Excellence. Prior to his appointment, he was one of the founding partners of Abrams & Laster LLP. While in private practice, he specialized in litigation involving Delaware corporations and other business entities, and advising on transactional matters carrying a significant risk of litigation. He also wrote and spoke frequently on aspects of business law. Before forming Abrams & Laster, he was a director of Richards, Layton & Finger P.A. Before joining Richards Layton & Finger, he clerked for the Honorable Jane R. Roth of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. He is a member of the American Bar Association, Delaware State Bar Association, and the Rodney Inn of Court.

  • Co-Sponsors
    Dennis J. Block Center for the Study of International Business Law
    Center for the Study of Business Law and Regulation

    Panelists
    Court Golumbic
    Managing Director, Global Compliance Department, Goldman Sachs

    Steven S. Michaels
    Counsel, Debevoise & Plimpton LLP

    David N. Kelley
    Former United States Attorney, Southern District of New York;
    Partner, Cahill Gordon & Reindel LLP

    Adam Siegel
    Partner, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer US LLP

    Moderator
    Miriam Baer, Associate Professor of Law, Brooklyn Law School

    Commentator
    James Fanto, Professor of Law;
    Co-Director, Center for the Study of Business Law and Regulation
    Brooklyn Law School

  • Sponsors
    The Center for the Study of Business Law & Regulation
    The Dennis J. Block Center for the Study of International Business Law

    Speaker
    Lawrence A. Cunningham

    Henry St. George Tucker III Research Professor
    The George Washington University Law School

    Commentator
    David Zaring
    Assistant Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics
    The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

    Moderator
    James Fanto
    Co-Director of the Center for the Study of Business Law and Regulation
    Professor of Law
    Brooklyn Law School

    About the Discussion
    The story of the American International Group includes several of the most dramatic episodes in the annals of corporate governance. This lecture is adapted from lengthier material in the book, The AIG Story, by Maurice R. Greenberg & Lawrence A. Cunningham (Wiley 2013). Summarizing the company’s culture and governance from its founding through 2004, The AIG Story is an account of the upheaval that ensued, in part due to matters of corporate governance.

  • Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Business Law and Regulation

    Speaker
    Vice Chancellor J. Travis Laster, Delaware Court of Chancery

    Panelists
    T. Brad Davey, Potter Anderson & Corroon LLP
    David A. Jenkins, Smith Katzenstein Jenkins LLP
    Paul K. Rowe, Wachtell Lipton Rosen & Katz

    Moderator
    Professor Minor Myers, Brooklyn Law School

    About the Discussion
    In public company mergers, the shareholder's appraisal right has long been regarded as a remedy that is risky, procedurally burdensome, and rarely invoked. But a number of recent developments in Delaware have turned appraisal into an area of hot conflict. Dissenting shareholders may now acquire shares and pursue appraisal even if they cannot vote against the merger, a traditional precondition for the remedy. This sets the stage for a market in appraisal claims, and investment funds may now view pursuing appraisal rights as a viable strategy. In addition, the emergence of quasi-appraisal as a remedy for post-closing disclosure violations may offer shareholders additional avenues for relief. At the same time, it may also alter the dynamics in more traditional merger litigation prior to closing. Are these developments that shareholders should welcome or fear? This program—featuring a leading Delaware jurist and a panel of prominent corporate litigators—will consider the future of appraisal in Delaware.

Symposium: The Market for Corporate Control in the Zone of Insolvency

Watch the Symposium on The Market for Corporate Control in the Zone of Insolvency

Have questions? We have answers.

Center for the Study of Business Law and Regulation

Co-Directors:
James Fanto
Professor of Law
james.fanto@brooklaw.edu

Edward Janger
David M. Barse Professor of Law &
Associate Dean for Faculty Research and Scholarship
edward.janger@brooklaw.edu

Associate Director:
Miriam Baer
Professor of Law
miriam.baer@brooklaw.edu