Curriculum

Law of Entrepreneurship

Credits: 3.00
Faculty: Paul Gangsei

Brooklyn Law School founded the Center for Urban Business Entrepreneurship (CUBE) to prepare law students, through practical experience, rigorous scholarship and policy analysis, to advise and participate in entrepreneurial ventures for start-up and growing business and not-for-profit organizations. Effective representation of entrepreneurial ventures requires an understanding of a variety of substantive areas of law in order to take a company, organization or venture from inception through operation to maturity and perhaps to disposition or transformation. The course of study will exemplify the multi-disciplinary nature of entrepreneurship law. Each week of the course and each chapter of the course materials will address material that could constitute - and almost certainly does constitute ? at least one independent course in the Law School. These areas will include entity choice and formation, intellectual property, financing, employment law, contracting and operational issues, financial structure and reporting, internet and on-line activity and eventually, in many cases, exit strategies. Much or even most entrepreneurial activity occurs in the commercial business sector. This is particularly true of the burgeoning technology sector so prominent in Brooklyn. However, this course will also address new entities and ventures organized as not-for-profit corporations or, more recently, as benefit corporations or other social enterprises. The unique characteristics of these different types of organizations will be examined from a foundational understanding of traditional business entities.